Hello there! I am so excited to share my first craft post and even more excited about it being about how to make your own loom.

          I decided to do this because weaving is literally so awesome and the art that comes from it is beautiful! I had a passion to try it but didn’t feel like spending $50 or more on a loom in case I didn’t end up enjoying it.

          So, I figured making a small loom was easy enough and I thought I’d share with others. There’s a lot of techniques out there, but I like how this looms turned out, plus it’s super easy to weave with.

Things You’ll Need:

  • 8 x 10 inch wood frame (buy here)
  • 18 gauge, 3/4 inch brass plated nails (buy here)
  • Hammer
  • Pencil
  • Ruler (with centimeters)
  • DMC Baroque Crochet Cotton Thread (buy here)
  • Scissors

Steps:

   1. Place ruler on the top and bottom of the back of the frame and pencil in 1 cm markings.

          The nails will be hammered into these markings, so make sure they are obvious.

          I made my marking on the outer portion of my frame, however, I put my nails on the ledge of the frame.

          I chose to do 1 centimeter spacing because I found it easiest to start weaving and can fit almost all sizes of yarn. However, having more strings allow you for easier designs in my opinion. If you’d like that try doing 1/2 cm spacing!

   2. Hammer nails in on markings.

          I chose to place my nails on the inner portion of the frame here, but on other frames, you may not have this option.

          In this case, you will place them on the main portion of the back of the frame. I decided to do it this way because I wanted to make it easier to hang up on a wall later. However, I’ve done both and they work equally as well.

          When hammering the nails be cautious of how deep the nails are going in. This is going to be based on the frame you use. The frame I used held up very well, however, I have used some frames where the wood cracked because of the nails! Please use caution!

   3. Use thread and string across the nails every two.

          Make sure nails are VERY secure before doing this step! I had to rehammer a lot of times and it was a major struggle bus!

    To string:

  1. Tie string at the end nail on the bottom side of the frame. I simply did a double knot.
  2. Then, tightly string up towards the nail parallel of the other side. String around two nails before bringing it back down to the bottom of the frame.

Note: pull strongly while stringing as weaving works best when strings are taught. I found it easiest to get a grip by holding the string by the nail you have previously just wrapped. Then while holding it your other hand can wrap over the next two nails and pull tightly.

Continue with this technique until all nails have been strung.

   4. Tie the last nail

          After all, nails have been strung, tie the last nail.

          You should be ending on the same side of the frame that you started at and should have one nail left. I ended up relooping mine on that nail and then tieing it to the top nail because I found that was easier to make sure it was tight.

   5. Double-Check

          I always like to recheck my DIY crafts after making them because sometimes things go wrong.

          Double-check that nails are all securely in place and that string is tightly wound. Multiple times I had to renail some of the nails that had come loose. This is normal because the string should be tight against them.


The end product should look like this! Once this is started you can begin to weave, which is beyond fun!

If you want more strings to weave through consider getting a larger frame. This size frame is perfect for 1 cm. separations and have worked great with all my weaving projects!

Hope you found this helpful and good luck weaving!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s